This Spectacular 120,000-piece LEGO Titanic MOC Might Break Your Heart

LEGO Certified Professional Ryan McNaught’s 120,000-piece LEGO Titanic MOC as it shows the legendary ship splits in half, and sinks at the bottom of the ocean after hitting an iceberg is already technically impressive as it is. However, what makes this masterpiece stand out is not just the sheer size of it, but also McNaught’s use of minifigures that evokes empathy even through a toy that was designed for fun and play.

At a technical level, McNaught’s LEGO Titanic MOC is awe-inspiring. He spent around 250 hours building his masterpiece. He also used several light bricks, adding a subtle drama to this scale model. It is also shows a degree of engineering ingenuity considering the manner on how the stern was able to be kept up. Most importantly, and perhaps what should not be missed, is the fact that this Titanic was built in proportion to the size of its minifigures.

Jan Dizon of The Tech Times vividly described how the minifigures were arranged to create a powerful emotional image. “Little LEGO men and woman are scattered throughout the ship and even in the water telling their own various mini stories of terror, and fighting for survival as the ship splits in half… there are minifigs hanging on for dear life. Four minifigs are working together to help their friend back up. One poor chap has a pile of ice that fell on top of him,” Jan reported.

While others marvel at the technical aspects of McNaught’s rendition, others were just uncomfortable with it. User comments at lego.gizmodo.com says that it was inappropriate to use minifigs to replicate such a tragedy. Others went as far as predicting that it’s not too soon that someone will come up with a Lego replica of the 9/11. It was a debatable issue though, since Lego is also known to come up with its own recreation of scenes from historical events including a controversial rendition of a Nazi concentration camp.

We surmise that it’s up to the person how he or she will look at it, but truth be told, McNaught’s creation will leave an indelible mark to those that will be fortunate enough to see it.

Thanks to LCP Ryan McNaught for sharing these images. For the rest of his amazing LEGO creations be sure to visit his Flickr page.

50,000 LEGO Bricks Used To Build This LEGO Renaissance Center MOC in Detroit

Yes, this might be easily passed for another LEGO City project or another Architect set to dive into, unless we tell you that its made of 50,000 bricks and is 6 feet high. This brick-built replica of the Renaissance Center in Detroit, Michigan is just one of the 10-Detroit areas that will be on permanent display as part of the attractions of LEGOLAND Discovery Center Michigan. This LEGO Renaissance Center MOC, which took four professionals 300 hours to make, was unveiled before a crowd of LEGO fans and enthusiasts inside the Cobo Center, where the North American Auto Show is taking place.

The miniature RenCen is one of 10 Detroit-area landmarks made of LEGO bricks that will be on permanent display when the LEGOLAND Discovery Center Michigan located at Great Lakes Crossing Outlets in Auburn Hills opens this spring. “The landmarks were chosen through online voting last year and Detroit’s glass-and-steel Renaissance Center was the top vote-getter”, said Hayley Anderson, general manager for the Michigan LEGOLAND.

Derek Chock, one of the four professional Lego builders who built the model from computerized blueprints shared some details on how this LEGO Renaissance Center MOC were built. “All of it except for the windows are regular LEGOs which you can go to the store and purchase. The reflective windows are pieces of laser-cut mirrored acrylic”. Derek is with U.K-based Merlin Entertainments, which owns and operates the Michigan-based LEGOLAND.

The other Detroit-area landmarks slated to be built entirely from LEGO bricks include:

    1. Spirit of Detroit sculpture
    2. Belle Isle
    3. Motown Museum
    4. Fox Theatre
    5. The Guardian Building in downtown
    6. Comerica Park
    7. Uniroyal Giant Tire
    8. Michigan Central Station
    9. The Heidelberg Project

Watch this short clip from the WCBD News 2 and tell us what you think.

 

Here’s How To Build Your Own Custom LEGO BB-8

The latest addition to the Star Wars family of droids has already left a mark on the hearts of endearing fans. The non-human but adorable BB-8 droid, with its flair for the dramatic, quickly gained a following among younger generation of Star Wars fans – not to mention a host of toys and other promotional memorabilia.

Since the last quarter of the year, the Net has been riddled with so many iterations of BB-8 either as toy figures, or actual working models, and this maybe the first attempt to create this droid from actual LEGO pieces. Sure, we know that the brick company is quick to catch on to the Star Wars hype. It even has a minifigure of BB-8 on one of its offered set. But it is yet to offer an actual challenge of building the robot itself. So while waiting for LEGO to release such a brick-built version of the newest droid on the block, let’s take a look at this custom LEGO BB-8.

One such fan took on the challenge of marrying his love for the Star Wars franchise and his love for the LEGO brick. Mashable’s Adario Stranger reports, “A Reddit user by the name of “hendrikdejager” recently posted his own LEGO version of the BB-8 droid on the site and it turned out pretty awesome. The mechanics of putting the Lego-made droid together are pretty tedious, which is why the maker posted a demonstrational how-to video (above) on YouTube on Tuesday”. Other than his video, this clever LEGO enthusiast also posted a detailed parts list for anyone else who wants to try their hand at making their own custom LEGO BB-8.

Watch this video and see if you can build one of your own.

 

 

This Custom LEGO AT-AT Took 6,000+ Parts and 26 Hours To Build!

If you’re the type that often complains while building LEGO models and sets out of the box, you might want to think again after watching this video. Peter Brookdale that goes by the profile cavegod2009 on Flickr, came up with a custom LEGO AT-AT which took 6,000+ pieces and 26 hours to build. Peter also came up with other amazing customized creations such as the Imperial Tie Fighter, Sandcrawler, Imperial Shuttle, and A-Wing. Based on the retired LEGO AT-AT (75054) model, you can just imagine how massive this project is, considering that LEGO first came up with the idea using only 1,137 pieces!

Charlie from BrickVault took on the challenge of Peter’s design and personally ordered the 6,000 LEGO bricks from BrickLink. Filming himself and a buddy for a total of 4 days, they came up with a time lapse video worth 26 hours of building time. Towards the end of the video, there were some modifications that needed to be done since they had a bit of a challenge in connecting the legs to the main body and making it stand independently. The exceptional attention to detail and smooth finish of this custom LEGO AT-AT owes it to what BrickVault calls as the SNOT Technique making for a smoother appearance. This is not the same thing that you want to sneeze out, but is an acronym for “Studs Not On Top”.

This is one LEGO build that is definitely worth more than a thousand words. Check out BrickVault’s video below and tell us what you think with his amazing feat.

 

Check Out This Fun Micro-Scale LEGO Disneyland MOC on LEGO Ideas

Nowadays LEGO seems to be into micro-sizing things that it finds worthy of attention. Even with its own theme sets, LEGO will throw in a micro-scale or two – such as the replica of a mini sub in The Lost City of Atlantis, or the Phantom ship in the Star Wars collection. Nick Carlierti, a certified brick fan, pays tribute to his love for theme park fun with his own version of a micro-scale LEGO Disneyland MOC project submitted on LEGO Ideas.

It’s amazing how these micro-scale sets are actually recognizable as the locations they’re trying to copy. With such few LEGO pieces, Nick’s attention to detail is pretty awesome. We hope to see his creation gets the support that it deserves from LEGO. Once it gets the needed 10,000 votes, then it’s up to the toy company to consider it for production. The only difficulty perhaps might be securing the rights to actually produce the set and we won’t find out unless the set gets the thumbs up from the LEGO jury.

For now, check out this cool animation of Nick’s micro-scale LEGO Disneyland MOC. Want it? Support it on LEGO Ideas!