LEGO Confirms Re-Issue of the LEGO Star Wars Resistance Bomber (75188)

This piece of news is rather odd, but in a relatively good way. If you recall back in 2017, one of the better sets that LEGO has released under the LEGO Star Wars The Last Jedi subtheme is the new Resistance Bomber (75188) set consisting of 778 pieces and 5 minifigures. One of these minifigures was simply referred to as Resistance Bomber Pilot, in honor supposedly of the pilot that coursed the bomber that destroyed the Dreadnaught at the opening sequence of The Last Jedi. It was a cliff hanger of a scene, with the entire crew of the lone Resistance Bomber eventually sacrificing their selves in order to carry out their critical mission. It is a great scene that eventually found its way as an official LEGO set. However, devout LEGO Star Wars fans quickly noticed the small, but very unpleasant inconsistency that this particular LEGO set has, and LEGO was quick to respond.

The LEGO Star Wars Resistance Bomber (75188) released in 2017.

According to an excellent summary written by The Brothers Brick, this nagging inconsistency was eventually addressed by LEGO. So what was it exactly? With the release of The Last Jedi: Cobalt Squadron novel, which is considered as part of Star Wars canon, the generic Resistance Bomber Pilot now has a name, and LEGO eventually re-issued a new minifigure to accurately represent his character. Named as Finch Dallow, LEGO has now confirmed that they will be re-issuing, or has issued an update already, to correct this matter. Though Finch was only given 5-seconds of screen time on the big screen, it was enough to give us a close look at the character.

British actor Kevin Layne who played the role of Finch Dallow in The Last Jedi.

As you may have noticed already, Finch’s character is very much different from his generic minifigure rendition that was released with the Resistance Bomber (75188) set. Thankfully, the matter was addressed by LEGO when it gave its official response to an inquiring fan:

“When we develop LEGO sets based on movies, we aspire to make minifigures and models that reflect the iconic characters and scenes in the film. For this reason our products are most often developed by LEGO designers using reference material from specific movies – still images, sketches, as well as in the actual movies as inspiration. We developed The Lego Star Wars Resistance Bomber set (75188), based on “The Last Jedi” movie and discovered after the film was released that one of The Lego minifigures in the set doesn’t reflect the movie scene properly. As a result, we decided to adjust the set accordingly, true to our motto: “Only the best is good enough”. We hope Star Wars fans across the world appreciate this attention to details”

It is a known fact that LEGO designers do not really receive the entire set of details about a film or a particular scene in which a LEGO set will eventually be based. This holds true in the case of the LEGO Star Wars Resistance Bomber. This adjustment resulted in the roll-out of a new and updated LEGO Star Wars Resistance Bomber (75188) that perfectly captures in minifigure form the character of Finch Dallow, including his Resistance helmet as well. Check out these side by side images, comparing the old and new minifigs, as shared by The Brothers Brick.

Image composite courtesy of The Brothers Brick.
Image composite courtesy of The Brothers Brick.
Image composite courtesy of The Brothers Brick.

Now I’m not really sure if this re-issued LEGO Star Wars Resistance Bomber set has already been released to the market, but an Instagram post from actor Kevin Layne who played the role of Finch Dallow, may hint that this re-issued set may already be out there.

The only question is where and how will you be able to get this set later on, considering that it is reasonable to expect that previously released Resistance Bomber sets with the generic Resistance Bomber Pilot minifigure, is still distributed in the market. Though as TBB observes, this kind of scarcity has led to some ‘overblown’ hype towards the Finch minifigure, as evidenced by its risen value of as much as $100 in some secondary market platforms. This is not something that  LEGO intends though, and I’m personally glad that LEGO has corrected this matter, though a little bit too late in my opinion.

Frankly, it’s now seems to a kind of hit and miss if you wish to get your hands on an updated set that contains the new Finch Dallow minifigure. Even if the Resistance Bomber is still up and selling at shop.LEGO.com, buying it from LEGO’s online store still doesn’t guarantee if ever you will receive the new minifig. In fact, the LEGO Shop@Home page for this particular set is still not updated with the new Finch minifig as of this posting.

Anyways, what are your thoughts about this change? Do you think it’s worthwhile to haunt down this set with the hope of landing on this new and accurate minifigure rendition? Let me know what you think in the comments below.

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SPOTTED: The LEGO Movie 2 Sewer Babies Minifigures

Since the first teaser trailer of The LEGO Movie 2 came out in June last year, there’s a particular group of minifigs that fans have been waiting to get their hands on. Thanks to an Instagram post by Mike Zuñiga (legocrcomunidad), we now have an idea on how to get the endearingly cute and tough, LEGO Movie 2 sewer babies!

The LEGO Movie 2 sewer babies are part of what seems to be a LEGO Movie 2 Minifigure Pack, similar to those from the LEGO Batman Movie and LEGO Ninjago. Other than the sewer babies, the LEGO Movie 2 Minifigure Pack also includes Emmet (yeah, LEGO is really Emmet in every TLM2 set) and a female minifigure which could either be Sharkira from Emmet and Lucy’s Escape Buggy (70829) or Roxxi from the D2C set Welcome to Apocalypseburg (70840). It’s really kind of hard to tell given the packaging’s reflection. This minifig pack also comes in at 48 pieces, and also comes with a minibuild. Instagram user the_real_fcl gives us a glimpse of how this minibuild looks like, which is kind of a half car front turned into a turret.

This TLM2 2 Minifigure Pack, together with the LEGO Movie 2 sewer babies were reportedly spotted in a LEGO certified store in Hong Kong and could probably sell for $12.99 per pack, similar to those from LEGO’s original themes. My only complaint about this is that I hope LEGO opted to include 4 or 5 LEGO Movie 2 sewer babies instead of only 2. They could have easily swapped Emmet for say, 2 additional sewer babies since the former is quite ubiquitous already. The sewer babies is a great addition to the LEGO Movie 2 D2C Welcome to Apocalypseburg (70840) if you’re planning to get one.

 

A New LEGO Battle Adventures Mobile Game Is In The Works

A mysterious Facebook page appeared a couple of days ago and it is only now that it’s getting some attention. From the looks of it, this new Facebook page is for a new LEGO mobile app entitled LEGO Battle Adventures. Details are scant as of now regarding the game itself, but a survey has been released in relation to the game, perhaps for marketing purposes. Again, the survey itself does not point to any specific direction or info about this new mystery LEGO game, but we can somehow piece together several details to have an idea of LEGO Battle Adventures is all about.

First off, LEGO minifigures will play a central role in LEGO Battle Adventures, and what is interesting here is that it seems that the minifigures involved are those that were released throughout its entire 40 years of existence, combining both the classic minifigures that we grew up with, to those that LEGO has recently offered.

LEGO Battle Adventures
LEGO Battle Adventures cover photo over at Facebook.

LEGO Battle Adventures also seems to be a turn based role-playing game (RPG) where you either get to team up with others over the Internet, or battle through enemy lines in solo mode. I assume that you can also build up your own army of minifigure warriors or soldiers depending on the mission. A part of the survey specifically mentions other game titles such as Star Wars: Galaxy of Heroes, Ninja Turtles: Legends, Marvel: Strike Force and others that may suggest that LEGO Battle Adventures may also belong to the same genre. The survey also gives a brief description about this mystery game.

LEGO Battle Adventures

Game description: BUILD your ultimate team and engage in an epic solo and multiplayer adventure in the first LEGO battle role playing game, celebrating LEGO iconic minifigures and sets from all eras!

LEGO Battle Adventures

LEGO is no stranger in the mobile gaming arena. It has released a handful of standalone LEGO mobile games in the past, with LEGO Cube being the most recent. And now, it looks like LEGO is gradually leveraging on an online platform that takes advantage of the rich, interactive play opportunities that multiplayer gaming has to offer. For the meantime, let’s wait and see how things will turn out, and hopefully we’ll learn more about this mystery game any time soon.

Thanks to Bricks to Life for the heads up.

These New LEGO Stores Gave Away 500 Limited and Exclusive Minifigures

These past few months we covered the upcoming openings of several new LEGO stores across the country: new branches in South Carolina, Louisiana, New York, and more. In fact, some opened even earlier than were originally announced, and in the same LEGO Store opening fashion, some giveaways were handed out.

When new LEGO Stores in Lakeside Shopping Center in Metairie, Metro New Orleans and in Ross Park Mall in Pittsburgh opened their doors to LEGO shoppers last weekend, the first 500 customers of each were presented with commemorative minifigures to mark the occasions, and each is appropriately dressed for the location.

The Louisiana minifigure is a funky jazz saxophonist dressed in a green and purple outfit, the colors of Mardi Gras. His Pittsburgh counterpart is a hockey player, whose blank black jersey happens to share the home colors of the NHL’s Pittsburgh Penguins. Both minifigures come in a LEGO Store Grand Opening foil pack with the names of the store locations as you can see from the images below shared by fans over Reddit.

Score. Grand opening swag. from lego

Exclusive figure for the Pittsburgh LEGO store grand opening from lego

 

In past LEGO brand store openings, the “first-500” welcoming gift had been a 3-pack of minifigures. With LEGO Stores now popping up all over like mushrooms, the cutting down to one is understandable; they even managed to match city themes. In case you’re wondering if they’re printed at the back, yes they are. According to those fortunate enough to grab their free LEGO swag, the backs of these minifigures are printed with the name of the LEGO Store where they were given away.

Of course, with the respective openings already over and done with, there’s no telling if there’ll be more of the New Orleans and Pittsburgh LEGO minifigures. They both were numbered in a 500 limited production run, so chances are, no. Perhaps somebody will eventually sell them for inflated prices online, but it’s up to you if you’ll keep an eye out for these or not.

LEGO Star Wars Magazine Issue 39 with Obi-Wan Kenobi Pilot Minifigure and Trading Card Now Available

One good thing about some official LEGO Magazines for some of its major licensed franchises is that sometimes their freebies are fairly uncommon little things. They can, for instance, be a certain minifigure from a large set; but as a freebie in a LEGO mag you get one technically free. That’s the deal going with the latest LEGO Star Wars Magazine Issue 39 of the official LEGO Star Wars Magazine, as it features one of the minifigures from the LEGO Star Wars set for the Jedi Starfighter with Hyperdrive (75191): Obi-Wan Kenobi. This is a fairly uncommon rendering of the Jedi Master as pilot.

LEGO Star Wars Magazine Issue 39

As for other content, LEGO Star Wars fans will certainly enjoy another month’s issue filled with fun puzzles, posters for their walls, and a variety of LEGO-styled comic stories. Some of them are tied into the included pilot Obi-Wan minifigure, but there’s also a mag promo to win a Kessel Run Millennium Falcon set (75212).

If you’re keeping up with collecting the new LEGO Star Wars trading cards introduced last month, then you’ll get the limited edition card LE02 from this issue 39 of the mag. Naturally, it’s Obi-Wan Kenobi. The official LEGO Star Wars Magazine from The Egmont Group is priced at £3.99 and is available now in Europe.

Happy 40th Birthday LEGO Minifigure!

Today marks the 40th birthday of the iconic LEGO minifigure and to mark this special occasion, The LEGO Group has shared several images and videos that traces the history of one of the world’s most recognizable toy element. To be exact, it was in 1977 that LEGO patented its unique yellow, plastic minifigure with the first minifigures rolling out in to the market a year after. Since then, LEGO’s minifigures have evolved from being single modular-like accessories to a full range of articulated figures that unmistakably give life to any LEGO set.

Read on for LEGO’s full press release and a video snippet highlighting the LEGO minifigure’s journey throughout the years. While you’re at it, and in case you have not gathered all 17 minifigs yet, be sure to check out the special 40th anniversary LEGO Collectible Minifigures Series 18 (71021) blind bags over at Amazon.

LITTLE FIGURE, BIG STORY – CELEBRATING THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE LEGO® MINIFIGURE

In 1978, Disco was dominating the charts, mobile phones were non-existent and the Internet was still more than a decade away. It was also the year the very first LEGO® minifigures went into production. Fast forward to today and those inaugural characters have evolved nearly as much as the world around them, offering endless roleplay possibilities. So, as one of the planet’s tiniest icons celebrates its big 4…0, here are some milestone moments from its very big story.

The evolution of the LEGO minifigure
It all started in 1974 when the LEGO building figure was launched, made mostly of large square LEGO bricks with moveable arms but immoveable legs. This was followed in 1975 by LEGO stage extra figures with solid torsos, immoveable arms and legs, and no printed features. Basically, very different to the LEGO minifigures we know and love today! Not that we had to wait too long for them to arrive, with 1978 ushering in a new era of LEGO minifigures equipped with moveable limbs and simple facial expressions comprising two solid black eye dots and black painted smile. Fast forward to 2018 and there are now more than 650 unique faces in the collection, meaning children can have fun roleplaying different characters and personalities – anytime, anywhere. 

2018 marks the 40th anniversary of the LEGO® minifigure: here are some of the many prototypes tested between 1975 and 1978 before the final decision was made to go for the iconic minifigure we know today – first launched in 1978.
2018 marks the 40th anniversary of the LEGO® minifigure. From left to right we see first three prototypes, then the very first LEGO minifigure space character launched in 1978, and finally the two on the end more recent space characters.
2018 marks the 40th anniversary of the LEGO® minifigure. From left to right we see first three prototypes, then the very first LEGO minifigure police character launched in 1978, and finally the two on the end 2018 models.
2018 marks the 40th anniversary of the LEGO® minifigure. From left to right we see first two prototypes, in the middle the very first LEGO minifigure doctor character launched in 1978, and finally the two on the end are 2018 models.

 

From 20 to 8,000
To begin with, there were around 20 different LEGO minifigure characters, including a police officer, doctor, firefighter, knight and astronaut. But in the four decades since, the number of minifigures available has risen to more than 8,000. To put that into context, if the global population had grown at the same rate, there would now be nearly 144 trillion of us living on Earth! 

2018 marks the 40th anniversary of the LEGO® minifigure. From left to right we see first two prototypes, in the middle the very first LEGO minifigure doctor character launched in 1978, and finally the two on the end are 2018 models.

 

The perfect height
Take away the hair or any other headpiece and LEGO minifigures are exactly the same height as four LEGO bricks fitted together. This means they fit perfectly into the LEGO System in Play. Oh, and if you stacked them head to toe, you would need 20,750 to reach the height of the world’s tallest building, Dubai’s Burj Khalifa.

Jack of all trades
Over the years, LEGO minifigures have shown they can turn their hand to pretty much anything. From pirates to paramedics, engineers to elephant keepers, veterinarians to Vikings, there have been thousands of different minifigure characters. Three LEGO minifigures even blasted into space onboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft in 2011. But one thing has remained consistent throughout: whatever role, character or personality children fancy playing, there’s sure to be a minifigure to match. 

Diversity Champion
Did you know the traditional yellow colour of the LEGO minifigure’s head was chosen based on focus group feedback in the early and mid-1970s saying this was preferable to white ones? Since then, minifigures have become increasingly diverse – from the first figures with natural skin tone in 2003 (Lando Calrissian from Star Wars and NBA basketball players) to 2016’s inaugural wheelchair. LEGO minifigures have also done their bit for unstereotyping gender roles with the likes of female firefighters and ninjas, through to fathers equipped with baby carriers. In fact, the whole point of minifigures is they let children create and be anyone they want – male or female, helmet or hair, freckles or glasses, anything. And if you’re worried about our robotic friends, don’t be. There have been plenty of C-3POs and R2D2s (not to mention other robots) too. 

Ca. 20 LEGO® minifigures were launched in 1978, here are three of the first with transportation. 2018 marks the 40th anniversary of the LEGO minifigure.

 

Hollywood Star

The LEGO minifigure has starred in a number of Hollywood blockbusters, including THE LEGO® MOVIE™, THE LEGO® BATMAN MOVIE™ and THE LEGO® NINJAGO MOVIE™. In 2007, LEGO Group even created 10,000 gold chrome C-3PO minifigures packed in random sets to mark the 30th anniversary of Star Wars.

1978-2018 precision mates
Did you know that eight different moulds are used for the production of every minifigure? Two sets of these moulds are the same in design but reversed to mould the right and left minifigure arms and legs! The precision that goes into these moulds is exceptional, and because the original moulds are almost identical to the ones we use today, minifigures from 1978 can be mixed and matched with the more modern characters from today! However, one thing that has changed is the number of elements each mould can produce and the speed scale of this – for example, the minifigure head mould construction has improved from an initial eight elements per 9,8 sec. to 128 elements per 14.7 sec. today!

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More than just a figure
LEGO minifigures may be made for fun but there’s a serious side to them as well. By offering an endless choice of roleplay possibilities, they’re designed to let children play inventively, engage with different emotions and tell their own stories. First and foremost, that means a whole lot of enjoyment. But, crucially, it also allows young people to develop key life skills like emotional intelligence, creativity and communication – skills that, according to new research for the LEGO Play Well Report, parents believe will be vital to helping their children build their own bright future.

LEGO Unveils First Minifigure in a Wheelchair in LEGO City Fun in the Park (60134)

A few days ago, LEGO released what could be its first person with disability minifigure. It was spotted by Promobricks at the Nuremberg, Germany and London toy fairs, photos of which were posted on their blog site and shared with the website. The first ever minifigure on a wheelchair is part of the newest set, LEGO City Fun in the Park (60134) City People Pack, and also includes an ice-cream vendor, cyclist, and picnickers and a host of other minifigs in a new park scene. The said PWD minifig depicts a young, cool guy donning a beanie and a hoodie together with his companion dog.

It caused quite a stir across social media because as we said, it’s a first for a LEGO – and a good one to. The sighting of this new minifigure is significant since the company has been bombarded recently with accusations for its lack of diversity, and stereotyping. LEGO in fact received a barrage of criticism from educators and activists, for releasing an elderly minifig with a wheelchair as part of the Duplo line which caters to toddlers and preschool aged children. According to its critics, the introduction of such figures in a toy system intended for very young kids reinforces the stereotypical image of elderly people as unproductive members of the larger society.

Now with the introduction of its first ever, wheel-chair riding minifigures in LEGO City Fun in the Park (60134), The LEGO Group might receive its needed PR boost. #ToyLikeMe co-founder Rebecca Atkinson, which spearheaded a petition at Change.org, managed to gather 20,000 signatures which lobbied Lego to include people with disabilities minifigures in its sets.  This could be a second milestone with regards to the issue of sensitivity and diversity among toy manufacturers, the first being with Mattel’s releasing of new body types for the world’s most famous doll, Barbie.

According to a written statement by Atkinson, “The whole issue came as a bit of a shock to me, because you can get tons of LEGO superhero figures, pretty much any kind you want. And there are disabled superheroes! But I looked it up. They do not have official LEGO Professor X figs or Barbara Gordon/Oracle figs. They don’t even have Stephen Hawking!” Though as the brick company claims, the LEGO system offers endless possibilities in coming up with figures that can be customized by any child to approximate his environment, it is the company’s official acknowledgment that activists were seeking.

The #ToyLikeMe organizers took this as a very positive gesture, and joyfully wrote on their campaign page, “We’ve got genuine tears of joy right now … LEGO has just rocked our brick-built world!”

“It’s pretty momentous, even though it’s just a little toy. It’s about the message behind it, which is far, far bigger than a little one-inch-tall plastic guy.”, Atkinson said.

LEGO will begin to offer this unique minifig through their LEGO City Fun in the Park (60134) City People Pack beginning July of this year. For now, check out this video from Promobricks regarding set 60134 as they spotted this during the Nuremberg Toy Fair. The featured image above is courtesy of Promobricks.